How To Improve Indoor Air Quality With Houseplants

Houseplants to purify the airOrdinary houseplants are trending. That’s if you put them in the shower. Shower plants are a Pinterest thing. If that’s not your thing, houseplants anywhere in your house will do. They increase your whole home comfort for less by improving your indoor air quality.

Shower plants

Pinterest is full of decorating ideas for bathroom plants.

While you can put houseplants anywhere in your bathroom, the shower is the best place. The plants will get watered naturally whenever you shower, without any extra work.

Plus, plants grow well in the bathroom because of the moisture from the shower. Think of it like a mini rainforest. Let the plants absorb some of the natural humidity in the bathroom.

Your exhaust vent, if working properly, will take care of the rest of the moisture so mold doesn’t have a place to grow.

There’s another health benefit too. Less stress! Houseplants enhance the feel of your bathroom, making it more spa-like. We want our homes to be comfortable. With comfort comes happiness.

So how do you make your shower feel like a spa without paying spa prices? Planterra, a Michigan plant design business, suggests putting your plant in a shower caddy. Orchids are a great choice for the shower, and they fit perfectly in the shower caddy.

Houseplants purify indoor air

Now that your home is Instagram-worthy, what are the benefits of houseplants?

Some houseplants have a cooling effect, lowering your energy costs in the summer. Even more than that, they can improve indoor air quality.

While it’s difficult to see all the contaminants in the air we breathe, indoor air pollution is a top risk to our health. Studies by the Environmental Protection Agency show indoor pollution levels are 2 to 5 times higher than outdoor.

There are many ways to improve the air quality in your home. Look at the cleaning products you use, have a trained HVAC professional assess your ventilation system, and add houseplants to your living space.

According to a NASA study, houseplants reduce both indoor and outdoor air pollution. Think back to your grade school science class. Plants absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen, which helps us breathe.

Researchers also found the plants absorb harmful contaminants found in the air. This includes formaldehyde and benzene.

Plant leaves absorb contaminants from the air and release them in their roots.

Plants also act as a natural humidifier. They release water vapor through their leaves which can raise the humidity level in your home. Some houseplants even absorb excess water in the air.

Healthy living with houseplants

There are a variety of house plants you can choose, each offering a different benefit. The University of Hawaii Extension Office has a full list of houseplants and their benefits.

While most of these plants improve indoor air quality, some also help cool your home in the summer.

Natural humidifier houseplants
  • Areca palm
  • Bamboo palm
  • Boston fern
  • Gerbera daisy
  • Kimberly queen fern
  • Peace lilly
Houseplants that perform well in low light
  • Corn plant
  • Dracaena
  • Dragon tree
  • Dwarf date palm
  • Rubber plant
  • Snake plant
Easy to grow houseplants
  • English ivy (also reduces mold)
  • Golden pothos
Houseplants that cool your home
  • Ficus
  • Aloe Vera

PlantNative can help you find the best native plants to add to your home.

So how many plants do you need to impact the air quality and temperature of your home? According to the University of Arizona Extension, to improve the air quality in an 1800 square foot house, you’d need 15 to 18 houseplants. Each one should range in size between 6 and 8 inches in diameter.

Make sure you check with your local nursery, as some plants may be dangerous to pets or young children if they are accidentally ingested.

Whether you put plants in your bathroom or living room, houseplants offer a lot of value for a small cost. They look nice and improve air quality at home.

Do you use houseplants at home to improve air quality?